• Re: Onwards and upwards

    From Brian Wood@woodbrian77@gmail.com to comp.lang.c++ on Sun Mar 14 18:33:39 2021
    From Newsgroup: comp.lang.c++

    On Monday, February 15, 2021 at 2:02:34 AM UTC-6, David Brown wrote:
    On 15/02/2021 03:16, Brian Wood wrote:
    On Sunday, February 14, 2021 at 6:15:57 PM UTC-6, David Brown wrote:
    On 14/02/2021 23:56, Brian Wood wrote:
    On Friday, February 5, 2021 at 4:43:26 AM UTC-6, David Brown wrote:
    On 04/02/2021 23:09, Brian Wood wrote:

    Perhaps we can at least agree that services are the most important
    form of software today
    Absolutely not, no. I don't really think it makes sense to talk about
    "the impost important form of software" - our way of life depends on a
    wide variety of software types. But if I had to pick one, it would be
    embedded software - the kind that most people never see, and never think >> about, but makes things work.

    Online code generators would rank down at the bottom of the list - they >> are not necessary in any way. They might sometimes be convenient, but
    they are not important.
    and that C++ is the most important language
    for services.
    Again, no. Most online services are written in other languages. C++ is
    not the worst choice (it's far better than C) for that kind of thing,
    but it is not a great choice either.

    At least you didn't say Scala or Ada or some other nonsense.
    Are you just picking random programming languages that you personally
    don't like?

    Different languages are suitable for different purposes - Ada and Scala
    have their place. C++ covers an unusually broad range of tasks,
    probably broader than any other language. But that doesn't mean it is
    the appropriate choice for all tasks. When I write online services
    (these are not public services), I don't use C++ - I use Python. Others
    use other languages, including some using C++.

    (A very quick and rough way to gauge the choice of language for online services would be to look at the Wikipedia page for "Comparison of web frameworks". Look at how many of these are written in the various
    languages - that will give you an idea of what people think is the right language for a task like that.)



    Or to the victor go the spoils:

    Are you offering money for the work? That would be entirely reasonable, >>>> and much more likely to succeed. Or are you merely offering Biblical >>>> quotations and the promise of Brownie points in the next life? That's a >>>> harder sell for most potential code reviewers.

    A lot of code review is done for free:
    https://www.reddit.com/r/codereview
    Sure - for free projects. No one does code reviews for free for
    commercial products. Why do you think people should review /your/ code
    for free?

    My software is free -- like duckduckgo.com.

    Your software is commercial, as far as I can see. Some of it is open
    source, but parts of it are closed source and your intention is to get
    paid for that software - it's part of your company business plan.
    (There's nothing wrong with that - people are free to choose what they
    give away and what they don't, and if you spend your time creating a worthwhile product or service, then it's natural to get paid for the effort.)
    It's both free and commercial -- like Duckduckgo.com.

    However, there /is/ something wrong with asking others to work for you
    for free so that you stand a better chance of earning money with the software.

    I'm not asking anyone to work for free. I'm asking for ideas on how
    to improve my SaaS. People are free to decide to reply or not. Over
    the years a lot of people have provided helpful replies.

    "Furthermore, the Israelites acted on Moses’ word and asked the Egyptians
    for articles of silver and gold, and for clothing. And the L-RD gave the >>> people such favor in the sight of the Egyptians that they granted their >>> request. In this way they plundered the Egyptians." Exodus 12:36,37

    I'm sorry, I can't see what relevance there is in quoting an old story book.
    The Israelites didn't pay for the items of gold and silver. G-d was
    saving them from their oppressors. Unfortunately, some of the
    regulars here are oppressors.

    No one here is oppressing /people/ - certainly not oppressing
    Christians, Jews, Israelites, Egyptians, or any other particular
    religion or nationality. People /do/ oppress preaching or pointless,
    off-topic and repetitive religious posts. Stick to the topic at hand.

    This reminds me of Don Cheadle's comment that cancel
    culture is "not really real." https://www.dailywire.com/news/don-cheadle-cancel-culture-is-not-really-real

    I don't know or care who that person might be, and we were not
    discussing "cancel culture" - real, imaginary, under-estimated or
    over-blown as it may be. It is this kind of rambling that makes it less likely for anyone to want to be connected with you.

    The topic is about how to improve my repo: https://github.com/Ebenezer-group/onwards

    First you have to give people a reason to help.

    and website:
    https://webEbenezer.net

    I can give you good advice here, but you are not going to like it. It
    is, however, a genuine recommendation of what would help your company.

    Find someone who is able to run a company, and pay them to fix yours.
    Pay someone to make you a website that looks like it is the site of a company. Get someone to put relevant information on the website, and
    remove the begging and pleading, and the irrelevant links (especially
    the antisocial ones).

    In general, you have to decide if you are a programmer, or a failed
    project manager and company owner. If you want your "CMW" to succeed as
    a project, find someone who can manage the project. If you want your
    company to succeed, find someone to run it. I'm sure you can do the programming fine, but that's not the main ability if you want to make a living from your software. Damn few people can manage to handle both
    roles well, and it's not easy (ask Jacob Navia how much free time he gets).
    --- Synchronet 3.18c-Linux NewsLink 1.113
  • From Brian Wood@woodbrian77@gmail.com to comp.lang.c++ on Tue Mar 30 16:53:34 2021
    From Newsgroup: comp.lang.c++

    On Sunday, March 14, 2021 at 8:33:50 PM UTC-5, Brian Wood wrote:
    On Monday, February 15, 2021 at 2:02:34 AM UTC-6, David Brown wrote:
    On 15/02/2021 03:16, Brian Wood wrote:
    On Sunday, February 14, 2021 at 6:15:57 PM UTC-6, David Brown wrote:
    On 14/02/2021 23:56, Brian Wood wrote:
    On Friday, February 5, 2021 at 4:43:26 AM UTC-6, David Brown wrote: >>>> On 04/02/2021 23:09, Brian Wood wrote:

    Perhaps we can at least agree that services are the most important
    form of software today
    Absolutely not, no. I don't really think it makes sense to talk about >> "the impost important form of software" - our way of life depends on a >> wide variety of software types. But if I had to pick one, it would be >> embedded software - the kind that most people never see, and never think
    about, but makes things work.

    Online code generators would rank down at the bottom of the list - they >> are not necessary in any way. They might sometimes be convenient, but >> they are not important.
    and that C++ is the most important language
    for services.
    Again, no. Most online services are written in other languages. C++ is >> not the worst choice (it's far better than C) for that kind of thing, >> but it is not a great choice either.

    At least you didn't say Scala or Ada or some other nonsense.
    Are you just picking random programming languages that you personally don't like?

    Different languages are suitable for different purposes - Ada and Scala have their place. C++ covers an unusually broad range of tasks,
    probably broader than any other language. But that doesn't mean it is
    the appropriate choice for all tasks. When I write online services
    (these are not public services), I don't use C++ - I use Python. Others use other languages, including some using C++.

    (A very quick and rough way to gauge the choice of language for online services would be to look at the Wikipedia page for "Comparison of web frameworks". Look at how many of these are written in the various languages - that will give you an idea of what people think is the right language for a task like that.)



    Or to the victor go the spoils:

    Are you offering money for the work? That would be entirely reasonable,
    and much more likely to succeed. Or are you merely offering Biblical >>>> quotations and the promise of Brownie points in the next life? That's a
    harder sell for most potential code reviewers.

    A lot of code review is done for free:
    https://www.reddit.com/r/codereview
    Sure - for free projects. No one does code reviews for free for
    commercial products. Why do you think people should review /your/ code >> for free?

    My software is free -- like duckduckgo.com.

    Your software is commercial, as far as I can see. Some of it is open source, but parts of it are closed source and your intention is to get paid for that software - it's part of your company business plan.
    (There's nothing wrong with that - people are free to choose what they give away and what they don't, and if you spend your time creating a worthwhile product or service, then it's natural to get paid for the effort.)
    It's both free and commercial -- like Duckduckgo.com.

    However, there /is/ something wrong with asking others to work for you
    for free so that you stand a better chance of earning money with the software.

    I'm not asking anyone to work for free. I'm asking for ideas on how
    to improve my SaaS. People are free to decide to reply or not. Over
    the years a lot of people have provided helpful replies.

    "Furthermore, the Israelites acted on Moses’ word and asked the Egyptians
    for articles of silver and gold, and for clothing. And the L-RD gave the
    people such favor in the sight of the Egyptians that they granted their
    request. In this way they plundered the Egyptians." Exodus 12:36,37 >>>
    I'm sorry, I can't see what relevance there is in quoting an old story book.
    The Israelites didn't pay for the items of gold and silver. G-d was >>> saving them from their oppressors. Unfortunately, some of the
    regulars here are oppressors.

    No one here is oppressing /people/ - certainly not oppressing
    Christians, Jews, Israelites, Egyptians, or any other particular
    religion or nationality. People /do/ oppress preaching or pointless,
    off-topic and repetitive religious posts. Stick to the topic at hand.

    This reminds me of Don Cheadle's comment that cancel
    culture is "not really real." https://www.dailywire.com/news/don-cheadle-cancel-culture-is-not-really-real

    I don't know or care who that person might be, and we were not
    discussing "cancel culture" - real, imaginary, under-estimated or over-blown as it may be. It is this kind of rambling that makes it less likely for anyone to want to be connected with you.

    The topic is about how to improve my repo: https://github.com/Ebenezer-group/onwards

    First you have to give people a reason to help.

    and website:
    https://webEbenezer.net

    I can give you good advice here, but you are not going to like it. It
    is, however, a genuine recommendation of what would help your company.

    Find someone who is able to run a company, and pay them to fix yours.
    Pay someone to make you a website that looks like it is the site of a company. Get someone to put relevant information on the website, and remove the begging and pleading, and the irrelevant links (especially
    the antisocial ones).

    In general, you have to decide if you are a programmer, or a failed project manager and company owner. If you want your "CMW" to succeed as
    a project, find someone who can manage the project. If you want your company to succeed, find someone to run it. I'm sure you can do the programming fine, but that's not the main ability if you want to make a living from your software. Damn few people can manage to handle both
    roles well, and it's not easy (ask Jacob Navia how much free time he gets).
    It seems that some haven't heard a word I've said in the
    last however many years here. On-line code generation
    is not just for breakfast anymore. It's not too late. By the
    grace of G-d, there's still time to improve my repo: https://github.com/Ebenezer-group/onwards
    Thanks and regards.
    --- Synchronet 3.18c-Linux NewsLink 1.113